Here is a simple free 2D (2 dimensional) Shed Plan

Click on image to download pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another free 2D plan

 

 

 

 

Here are some 3D plans for beginners for better visualization. Click on images.






Here are some eligible states that will give you a live person to talk to:

Click the button below only if you live in one of these states.

Own Your Own Energy!

What if you could finance a whole solar panel installation that eliminated your electrical bill and then made payments equal to your electrical bill over a short period of time?

Think of it like paying your electric bill over a 2 year period like you normally would.  Only this time your are really paying off your solar panels.

Then after 2 years there would be no more bill at which point you look outside and see your solar panels still doing all the work but now for free.

This is exactly the same as paying an electrical bill for 2 years and then getting solar panels for free.  Just change who you pay.

 

Solar panels work anywhere in the world even in cloudy areas.

80% of sunlight still gets through the clouds.

Solar panels have been on the market since the 70’s and 40 years of improvements they are now super efficient.

Anyone can afford them and get with the program.

Did you know you can get solar panels and the US government will help pay for them… ?

Many Americans are saving big on their energy bills by installing government sponsored solar panels

Here are some eligible states that will give you a live person to talk to:

Click the button below only if you live in one of these states and want to talk to a live person.

  • Arizona
  • California
  • Connecticut
  • Hawaii
  • Massachusetts
  • Maryland
  • New Jersey
  • New York

See Zip Codes Qualifying For Government Financed Heat Efficient Windows

Is your zip code is located in areas where too much energy is spent cooling down in summer and heating up in winter?

If you answered “yes” then you most likely qualify for Government financing to replace your old windows with new energy efficient ones.

Thanks to a little-known government program, middle class homeowners in specific zip codes can get $1,000’s in tax credits and rebates to install new energy efficient windows for $0 out of their own pocket.

Find out if your zip code qualifies.

Millions of Americans don’t realize the government could cover all the expenses for changing their old windows . Qualifying for free energy efficient windows is very easy and they don’t even realize it.

The U.S. Department of Energy finances energy efficient windows for your family’s home if your zip code qualifies!

How Does This Program Work?

The government wants you to switch to this type of glazing because it is better for the economy. President Trump would readily agree.

Here’s is how a typical bill would change:

The cost of these windows are expensive but nevertheless to get more Americans to go with energy efficient windows the U.S. Government is quietly giving away free windows to families who qualify.

This allows homeowners like you to finally have new energy efficient windows to reduce your energy consumption, help the environment and save you some dollars on your energy bill  for your home, potentially for $0 down. The U.S. government will help you cover the expense with generous tax credits, rebates, and incentives. It’s a serious score for homeowners!

Find out if your zip code qualifies.

The Time to Act is Right Now

You probably haven’t heard about this program before because just like so many tax breaks and incentives, it’s just put out there with little fanfare and only the insiders take advantage of these incentives.

How Do I Find Out if I Qualify?

It’s 100% free to see if you qualify, and takes about one short minute.

Step 1: Click your state on the map, and enter your zip code to instantly check your eligibility for free.

Step 2: You will find out if your area qualifies and how much you will save. Many families save BIG on energy costs, simply by changing their windows and taking advantage of government programs like these.

 

 

 

 

The Concave Roof was engineered for arid environments, where rainwater collection can be tricky due to higher than average evaporation rates and low annual precipitation. The double-roof system, which includes a domed roof beneath a bowl-shaped catchment area, is designed to “help [make] even the smallest quantities of rain [flow down] the roof and eventually coalesce into bigger drops, just right for harvesting before they evaporate,” said the architects to ArchDaily. Stacking a concave roof atop a convex roof promotes natural cooling through shade and wind movement between the two roofs.

Concave Roof by BMDesign Studios, rainwater collection roof designs, Concave Roof for collecting rainwater, double roof system for rainwater harvesting, natural cooling roofs

Related: Rammed earth house blends traditional materials with modern techniques in Vietnam’s last frontier

The bowl-shaped catchment area is steeply sloped to move raindrops towards a central collection point, where the rain is funneled into reservoirs. The reservoirs are placed between building walls to help regulate indoor temperatures. With this system, the architects estimate that 28 cubic meters of water could be harvested with just 923 square meters of a concave roof surface. BMDesign Studios’ vision also goes beyond the double-roof system and includes a massing design where the buildings and courtyards are sunken to promote natural cooling. The buildings would be organized around atriums to promote circulation and community.

Courtesy of http://inhabitat.com/bowl-shaped-roofs-harvest-rainwater-and-promote-natural-cooling-in-arid-environments/

For those who will be fortunate enough to reside in a
brand-new community being erected in a suburb of
Amsterdam, the future of sustainable suburban
communities looks bright. Residents may find that
their dining room is adjacent to an indoor vegetable
garden, while just outside the window rests a seasonal
garden. They will also find that all the food for this
community is being grown just down the road in
vertical farms, using the latest inventions of the
gardening industry.

This neighborhood isn’t part of some sci-fi fiction, it
has a name; the first ever ReGen Village. Engineers
have designed this community to be entirely
self-sufficient and sustainable. The village will grow
food for residents, produce all the energy requirements
for the village, and dispose of all waste on site in a
closed loop community.

All conventional household waste products that can
be composted will be used to provide food for
livestock as well as soldier flies. The flies will then
be used to feed fish, while fish waste is used to provide
fertilizer for an on-site aquaculture system that grows
fruits and vegetables for the village residents. Seasonal
outdoor gardens will receive fertilizer from the waste
produced by livestock.

ReGen-Village-Community
Image Source: http://inhabitat.com

Implementing the most innovative technologies for
producing food—a combination of high yield vertical
farms, food forests, aquaponics, aeroponics, and
permaculture—this village will produce several times
the food of a traditional land farm of the same
dimensions, with far fewer natural resources. For
example, aquaponics can produce 10 times as much
food as would be grown on the same acreage of land,
while simultaneously reducing water consumption by
90%.

The Awesome Daily: “We anticipate literally tonnes
of abundant organic food every year—from vegetables,
fruit, nuts, legumes, fish, eggs, chicken, small animal
dairy and protein—that can continually grow and
yield in the vertical garden systems all year long.”
says James Ehrlich, CEO of ReGen Villages.

In addition to producing its own food and disposing of
waste, the village will produce all its own energy needs.
This will be done using a combination of wind, solar,
geothermal, and biomass.

Wonderful Engineering: “We’re looking at some very
interesting technologies for small-footprint biomass
that can take surrounding farm waste and turn that
into a consistent energy source in a way that can power
these communities in northern Europe even in the dead
of winter,” Ehrlich says.

Incorporating smart grid technologies, power will be
distributed efficiently. All household waste not able to
be composted will be disposed of in a biogas plant
which will convert the waste into water and/or power.
Water storage systems will collect and contain both
rainwater and gray water, which it will distribute to
the aquaponic systems and seasonal gardens of those
living in the village.

This ReGen community will be the first in a network
of similar villages the company has plans to build all
over the world.

Organic & Healthy: “We’re really looking at a global
scale,” he says. “We are redefining residential real-estate
development by creating these regenerative
neighborhoods, looking at first these greenfield pieces
of farmland where we can produce more organic food,
more clean water, more clean energy, and mitigate
more waste than if we just left that land to grow organic
food or do permaculture there.”

Plans for the first 100-home sustainable community
broke ground this past summer and looks to be completed
sometime in 2017. This initial village will be set outside
the town of Almere, roughly 20 minutes from Amsterdam
by train. After this community, the company has short
term plans for projects in Denmark, Germany, Sweden
and Norway, and long term plans to break ground in the
Middle East.

The ReGen community in Almere will produce roughly
half of the food required for the residents of the village;
some things will not be grown, such as coffee and
bananas for example. It will however produce enough
energy to feed back into the grid locally. In future
locations, the company is confident that the villages will
be completely self-sufficient.

Any garden without a greenhouse is incomplete – in fact, the real charm of a big garden lies in a simple and small greenhouse. You really do not need an expensive one, neither a really good budget to feed your desire. Rather, DIY greenhouse project is the perfect thing for you. This excerpt is all about how to build a greenhouse on your own with simpler stuff that you might get for a few dollars. Also if you are looking for some other mechanisms to extend the growing season just go through these cold frame plans.

1: Barn Greenhouse

If you want to build a small greenhouse, this wooden barn greenhouse plan would work best for you. Get started by working on the idea given below:

Cut the wall framing from the boards (wood) you have available – you can even purchase it for a few dollars easily.for the side paneling you can use roofing tin, it would provide strength to the house as well. You can use metal flashing to trim the corners of the panels. Also, this type of greenhouse’s entire structure is covered with corrugated roofing. For details just go through this barn greenhouse plan.

barn green house

2: Lumber Frame Greenhouse

You can make a smart 8ft in height homemade greenhouse with a beautiful garden – all you need is a lumber frame for the foundation, big window frames for ventilation, and a door of course. You can nail the frame and fix it in the garden with stakes. Diy greenhouse

lumber green house

3: Hoop Style Greenhouse Plan

All you need is:

Wood for laying out the basic foundation – measurements solely depend upon the area you want to cover.

Rebar for making the hoop stand – take the open ended PVC pipes and fix them on the hoop stands. For the better grip, you can simply use screws to tight the PVC pipe and the stand.

In order to provide strength to the circular frame, insert strong PVC pipe at the top.

Cover the entire naked greenhouse with plastic sheet and attach it with the lathe. Lastly, do not forget to add the door, the basic wood frame which has plastic covering all around; and you are done. See the detail greenhouse plan

hoop style green house

4: Small Greenhouse

The first step is to build the side frames – also, you must cut the ends of the studs keeping 8 inch difference. After that you must drill pilot holes in the frames and fix them with the screws. Likewise you can make the front and the back of the greenhouse – place the horizontal plates of this structure and in the similar manner, fix them with screws; you will find it an easier process. Lastly, make the door with basic wooden frame and place it on the front side – in order to provide the perfect professional touch, you can coat the entire joint area with the paint of your choice. Detail plan

small green house

5: $50 Greenhouse Plan

Hoop like greenhouse are very popular – here is another plan for getting a tunnel type greenhouse, these are ideal to have a small greenhouse garden too. You can construct the basic frame from pressure or compressed lumber. They last for at least 3 years even if the weather it at worst. You can leave the door open while making the structure – for the covering or top, you can use clear sheets or plastic. In the market you can easily find a special type of greenhouse sheets too. Last but not the least, insert or attach PVC pipes at the sides of the wooden structure so that it maintains the shape of the hoop. For details just go through this 50$ green house plan.

Article info comes from http://theselfsufficientliving.com/10-diy-greenhouse-building-plans/ 

Installing a home security system used to mean spending hundreds of dollars to have professionals come and hardwire your house, signing a long-term contract, then paying huge fees month after month in order to keep the thing running. Systems weren’t flexible, false alarms were frequent, and if you were a lowly renter, you were out of luck — despite the fact that rental units get burglarized more often than any other kind of property.

Times are changing, though, with a smart new wave of home security systems that’s changing the way we think about protecting our homes. These new systems are built around plug-and-play, DIY-friendly devices and sensors that work with your smartphone, move when you need them to, and put you in control of how you protect your home, whether you own a five-bedroom townhouse or rent a studio apartment. Best of all, these systems come with no contracts, and in many cases, no monthly fees — meaning that peace of mind is more affordable than ever.


Canary

Perhaps the slickest-looking security device ever created, the $199 Canary is an all-in-one security system with an assortment of smart sensors built right into it. There’s Wi-Fi, a night-vision-ready camera that you’ll be able to access v ia a smartphone app, and motion, temperature, and humidity sensors all packed inside, along with learning technology that will adapt to your habits over time, leading to fewer false alarms. You won’t be able to hook up any external sensors with the system, though, and in the event of an emergency, it’ll call you, but not the police.

Still, Canary raised over $2 million during an immensely successful Indiegogo campaign, and big names like Khosla Ventures and Bobby Yazdani recently invested over $10 million in the device, so it’s clearly something people are excited about. Could Canary break out big and do for home security what the Nest did for thermostats? We’re not sure, but we’re looking forward to getting our hands on one when it’s finally released in the coming months. Just one question — why isn’t it yellow? (Availability and pricing outside the US are unknown at this time.) Read our full preview of Canary.

Article imported from https://www.cnet.com/news/diy-home-security-roundup/ 

 

From the smallest dent to large holes, there are several ways to fix surface defects on your walls.

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Product costs, availability and item numbers may vary online or by market.

Before You Shop

Consider these points and plan your purchases accordingly:

  • Decide whether you want to repaint the whole wall or just touch up patched areas. If you’re patching tiny nail holes, you can cover up the repairs by dabbing on touch-up paint with a soft cloth.
  • If you’re patching a large number of holes and other damage, prime the patched walls before repainting — especially if you’re choosing a semi-gloss or shinier finish. The higher the gloss, the more different surface textures appear between the patch and the surrounding paint.
Caution

Before you begin your repair, it’s important to know the utility placement in your home. Typically, electric wires are attached to wall studs. Locate the wall studs before you begin cutting, drilling or nailing drywall.

Caution

Wear protective clothing, work gloves, goggles and a dust mask when working with drywall.

Small Dents and Dings

spackle bringing a small dent level in drywall repair

Scrape away loose debris from the hole. Cover the hole or dent with fast-drying spackle to bring the spackle level with the drywall surface and let it dry 24 hours — or the time recommended by the manufacturer’s instructions. Sand smooth.

Watch our Video: How Do I Use Sandpaper?

Popped Nail Heads

A popped nail isn’t holding in the stud and backs out of the drywall, creating a popped nail head.

Step 1

driving screw beneath the drywall surface for popped nail repair

Drive a drywall screw 1 1/2 inches above the popped nail head into the stud to reattach the drywall to the stud. Sink the screw head just below the surface of the drywall so it can be covered with spackle.

Step 2

popped nail now beneath the wall surface

Drive in the popped nail.

Step 3

apply spackle over drywall repair to bring the surface level with the wall

Cover the sunken screw head and nail head with spackle until level with the wall surface. Wait 24 hours or the time recommended in the manufacturer’s instructions. Sand smooth.

Small Holes

For small holes, like those created by a doorknob, a patch kit may be used.

Step 1

mesh patch over a small hole in the drywall

Place the self-adhesive mesh patch over the hole.

Step 2

covering mesh patch on drywall with joint compound in criss-cross pattern

Use a drywall knife to cover the patch with lightweight joint compound in a crisscross pattern, feathering the edges so it blends with the wall. To feather the edge, increase pressure and angle on the drywall knife as you reach the outer edges of the patch area to minimize, or thin, the joint compound on the drywall.

Step 3

2nd coat of compound on drywall patch

Let the patch dry and apply a second coat of compound if needed. Sand smooth.

Medium Holes

For holes up to 6 inches, use the California Patch.

Watch our DIY Basics video: How Do I Cut Drywall?

Step 1

cutting a piece of drywall that will become the patch for repair

Cut a piece of drywall into a square shape that’s 2 inches larger in width and height than the area to be repaired.

Step 2

back of patch with lines drawn 1-inch from each edge

Score the back of the drywall with a box cutter or knife about an inch from each side.

Step 3

patch with pieces of gypsum snapped away but paper backing left intact

Snap off the gypsum, but leave the paper backing intact.

Step 4

tracing around the gypsum part of the patch for drywall repair

Hold the patch over the hole and trace around the gypsum square. Do not include the paper border in your transfer. Cut out the traced square with a drywall knife.

Caution

Before cutting, check the hole for electrical wires. Typically, they are attached to studs.

Step 5

applying compound to the back of the drywall paper to adhere the patch to the wall

Apply joint compound to the back of the paper border. Fit the gypsum into the new hole and press the paper edges coated with joint compound into place along the outside edge of the hole.

Step 6

spackle covering entire california patch, feathering the edges onto the drywall

Cover the entire patch with joint compound until the lines are camouflaged, feathering the edges.

Step 7

drywall patch with two coats of compound

This patch may require two coats of compound, with dry time in between coats. Sand smooth.

Large Holes

For holes larger than 6 inches, you’ll create a drywall patch with a different attachment method for the repair.

Step 1

cutting a scrap piece of drywall a little larger than the wall damage

Cut a piece of drywall into a square a little bit bigger than the hole.

Step 2

tracing the edges of the drywall patch with a pencil

Hold the square over the hole in the drywall and trace around the edges.

Step 3

cutting large hole with a drywall knife

Cut along the lines on the wall with a drywall knife.

Caution

Before cutting, check the hole for electrical wires. Typically, they are attached to studs.

Step 4

securing furring strips with a drill and drywall screws

Inside the hole, attach a furring strip, a small, thin piece of wood, to either side of the hole with screws. Sink the screws beneath the surface of the drywall.

Step 5

securing large drywall patch to furring strips with drywall screws

Set the drywall patch in place and screw it into the furring strips, sinking the screws beneath the surface of the drywall.

Step 6

drywall patch with mesh tape around the seams

Apply joint tape to the borders of the patch. Joint tape is made of mesh and strengthens the bond between the patch and the wall, reducing movement and helping to prevent future cracks.

Step 7

joing compound covering both drywall patch and mesh tape

Cover the patch and tape with joint compound, feathering the edges. Allow the compound to dry according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Apply a second coat if needed. Sand smooth.

Corner Bead Patch

Corner bead is used where two pieces of drywall meet to form a corner. Corner bead is available in a variety of materials, including metal, paper and vinyl.

Step 1

hacksaw cutting through damaged corner bead

Cut the damaged corner bead horizontally, both above and below the mar, with a hacksaw.

Step 2

utility knife connecting the horizontal cuts made by the hacksaw

Use a utility knife to cut vertically along the drywall, connecting the top and bottom cuts from the hacksaw on the left and right sides. Remove the damaged piece.

Step 3

snipping the corner bead to the repair area

Cut a new piece of corner bead to fill the gap and attach it to the wall with nails or the manufacturer’s recommended fastener or adhesive.

Step 4

applying compound to the corner repair with a drywall joint knife

Apply joint compound to both sides of the corner, covering the bead patch to smooth rough edges and cover any seams, feathering the edges. Let dry and sand smooth.

Finish the Repair

Step 1

sanding the drywall repair with a sanding sponge

Finish all repairs with a final light sanding to ensure a satin smooth finish and seamless blending between the patch and the wall.

Step 2

applying primer over the repaired drywall

Cover with a coat of primer, and let dry.

Step 3

rolling interior paint onto the repaired drywall

Finish with paint.

Repair Textured Drywall

Step 1

bristles of stiff brush coated with compound

Sand your patch area smooth. In a small bowl, mix 4 parts joint compound and 1 part water. Dip a stiff brush into the mixture and hold it close to the wall, bristles up.

Step 2

texture developing on repair area from compound flicking

Flick the mixture onto the wall by running a gloved finger across the surface of the bristles. Typically, the faster the flicking motion the smaller the particles on the wall.

Good to Know

Practice and perfect the flicking motion on a scrap board before applying to your wall.

Step 3

flattening the flicked compound with a drywall joint knife to create a knock-down finish

For a knock-down finish — one where a trowel presses joint compound down to form a texture that’s more mottled than a flat wall — lightly flatten the particles with a knife as the compound mixture begins to dry.

Step 4

spraying repair area with texturizing spray

As an alternative to flicking compound, you can use textured spray in a variety of finishes. Shake the can and spray the patch area in a circular motion 6-18 inches from the wall.

Step 5

cans of texture spray for manufacturer's instructions

Allow the textured compound to dry according to the manufacturer’s instructions, then prime and paint the surface.

Reference: https://www.lowes.com/projects/repair-and-maintain/patch-and-repair-drywall/project